March 20, 2008

The language we speak

Posted in I didn't know that!, Misc. tagged , , at 9:25 pm by Olórin

 

Halo!  Hows it going? Hope everyone’s enjoying the extended weekend! ^_^

I’m sure all of you heard about Government’s resignation and dissolving of the Parliament! At first when I read the message from Barlamani (Don’t get me started on that messaging service! They drill you with messages you can’t cancel!) I thought it was a joke! Have you ever heard of a country without a Government nor a Parliament?! Quite disturbing! Don’t know how long we’ll be like this, but I’m guessing we’d better get used to it!

Anyway,

Most of us speak Arabic and its our native-tongue, right? But do most of us know the origins of this language? Me no tink so!

Okay first thing you need to know is that our awesome language descended from the Semitic Languages, which are – according to Wiki – a family of languages mostly originated in Northern Africa and the Horn of Africa. Other family members of the Semitic Languages are Amharic, Tigrinya and Hebrew among some others. What’s cool about the Semitic Languages (Thus Arabic) is that its one of the earliest languages to get a written form. And Arabic is considered the largest Semitic Language alive, also, Ancient North Arabian – the earliest Proto-Arabic dates back to 6th Century B.C (whoooa!!) – did not use normal alphabets, but used epigraphic Musnad alphabets!

Can you believe that Arabic is a major source of vocabulary for languages such as Berber, Kurdish, Persian, Swahili, Urdu, Hindi, Turkish, Malay and Indonesian? Even Spanish and Portuguese have a large amount of loan words!

“Many words in English and other European languages are derived from Arabic, often through other European languages, especially Spanish and Italian. Among them are commonly-used words like “sugar” (sukkar), “cotton” (quṭn) and “magazine” (maḫāzin). English words more recognizably of Arabic origin include “algebra”, “alcohol”, “alchemy”, “alkali” and “zenith.” Some words in common use, such as “intention” and “information”, were originally calques of Arabic philosophical terms.” – Wiki.

Another cool fact is that Arabic is considered to be the most Semitic language in which it preserved its features completely through time!

So you can say that the language we speak is one of the oldest and influential languages of the world… So proud I am!!

I can’t believe many Arabians are neglecting this amazing language!

March 8, 2008

…And with that comes responsibility!

Posted in Misc., Photography at 2:41 pm by Olórin

Aaah what a lovely morning! It’s been quite long since the last time I’ve had a good morning like this! A good breakfast with nothing to do afterwards and refreshing A/C air (my room is above the kitchen, opening the window at this hour would be a serious mistake) so I open the window quite early in the morning for new oxygen but now I don’t have to!

Warning: Long and boring post ahead! Readers uninterested in teen drama kindly skip to the photos.

Sometimes it’s so hard to follow the path you’ve chosen for yourself if it meant sacrificing things that were once – and still are – essential in your life.. so essential to you and you were practically revolving around them. Sometimes you wonder “Have I made a mistake?” “If it’s for the best..why am I so miserable?”

It’s funny how you can force yourself into abandoning the things that were once your life even though they weren’t ethically or religiously wrong..for your life. A lot of my friends told me that I’m strong and have a unique ability of controlling myself. but they’re quite wrong.. I don’t think that’s an ability.

I’ve changed..that’s all..my views have changed dramatically since then and I don’t think I would be happy now if I hadn’t let go. When I think about it.. I was a kid before and I had the right to do whatever I want, but now it’s quite different, I’m older and with that comes responsibility (the cliche that became a cliche for a reason!)

The process of change is quite weird, you only notice it after awhile but those around you notice every detail of it but say nothing, knowing it’s for your own good to keep quiet, not to disrupt it. My goals in life and an image of who I wanted to become slowly started to form and I realized that in order for me to pursue such goals I have to let go of many things..

That led to sleepless nights and countless panic attacks but I managed to come through and cut the strings that were once holding me together. It was the summer of my graduation from high school..Escaped to Saudi to stay with my grandmother for the summer to forget and figure out what to do next.

When I came back..depression struck! Couldn’t even get out of bed, everything was changing around me, even my friends were going their separate ways in college..guess I picked the wrong time to do it.

Meh guess that’s what makes us stronger, right?

After 3 years of struggle and serious decisions I finally started to settle and finish the first stage of forming myself. And what gave me a boost was last summer.. I had a chance to get it all back together but I refused and realized that even if I went back it wouldn’t be the same because I changed! I changed the SECOND I decided to change!

*looks up* 00; Oh my..too much negative energy! Sorry about that, dear ones!

On a different note..here’s an image I took of Duomo di Milan.

We were on the roof of the Duomo when I took this shot, about 100 metres high! What a place!

Unfortunately the Cathedral was under maintenance when we got there so I couldn’t get a proper shot of it’s front =[

March 1, 2008

Cross-Cultural Differences? (Disaster!)

Posted in I didn't know that! tagged , , , , , , , at 2:05 pm by Olórin

           

I used to think that the whole world nods in approval and shakes head sideways in disapproval! Vell I was wrong! Even though the majority express it this way,According to Charles Darwin, author of “The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals (1872)”  there are some exceptions!

Australian natives:

“don’t shake the head, but holding up the right hand, shake it by turning it half round and back again two or three times.”, A certain Native told Darwin that Abyssinians expressed the word “no” by tilting the head to the right and making a slight cluck, and “yes” by throwing the head back and raising the eyebrows instantly.

Eskimos:

Nodded for yes and “winked” for no! (LOL! We would be lost if we went up there!)

Bulgaria:

Okay this is where trouble ensues! There a nod means “no” and a head-shake means “yes”. (Imagine the catastrophe! I can’t believe my parents lived there for 3 years!)

 Turks:

Their “yes” is shaking head from side to side and “no” is throwing the head back and make a slight cluck! (Yawch I got my hair cut yesterday by a Turkish woman! no wonder she kept repeatedly asking me, I remember nodding a lot 00;)

Other misinterpreted gestures:

We do the Thumbs-up as a sign of approval inspired by the Romans, Sadly, zat’s a myth! It happened as a result of successive mistranslations that we think it’s how the Romans showed mercy. The real gestures were hiding the thumb in a clenched fist, signaling mercy, and if they wanted the dude torn apart they would extend their thumb in a stabbing motion.

The Thumbs-up sign is known world-wide as an “OK” gesture, but in Sardinia and Greece it means “Screw you”! (So..in your future visits to Greece inshalla, Just nod your head ^^; )